Influential Networking Tips From a Personal Experience

I wanted to send the most insulting email back.  I was beyond insulted and wanted to rip off some heads.  Let me rewind a little bit.  I was negotiating a deal with a door to door sales company.  I thought we were close on terms and was looking forward to getting the deal done.  This company had wanted Lance Conrad and I to consult for them.  When the offer came in, it was offensive from our perspective.  It wasn’t even in the ballpark of what we discussed.  When I say it wasn’t even in the ballpark I mean it was about 10% of what we expected the offer to be.  At first, I felt undervalued by the offer and wanted to write a belittling email back.   As I thought about it rationally, I came to the conclusion that if I were to respond in such a way, nothing good would come out of it.  I have learned to always try to take the emotion out of it and ask myself what good can I make out of this particular situation?

I decided to respond back bluntly, but very respectfully.  I clearly communicated what I felt but in a way that wasn’t offensive.  I gave my perspective, but also let them know that if things didn’t work out, maybe we could help each other down the road.  You should ALWAYS leave the door open and think long term when you are networking. Do NOT burn your bridges!

Had I sent the initial reactive and negative email I wanted to send, a future partnership would have never been formed.  Instead, we were able to work out our differences and provide value for each other.  It is hard to send an email that isn’t based on emotion but here are 4 tips that will help you. 

4 TIPS

  1. Take the emotion out of it as much as possible and clearly communicate your INTENTIONS.  
  2. When you are upset, the best thing to do is to wait a day to respond.
  3. Have a trusted friend look over your email before you send it.
  4. If you can, I would always have a conversation rather than an email.  When you do have this conversation, watch your tone and always make sure you see things from the other party’s perspective.  Letting them know you understand where they are coming from goes a long way.  You can still disagree with them while understanding where they are coming from.   

Another insight that I have learned is that those who are weak where you are strong will offend you the most!  If you are a people person who is very thoughtful and the other person is not, then they will typically offend you more often than someone who is a people person.  We see the world through our perspective.  We expect others to be strong where we are strong because to us it is just plain common sense. Learn to notice and appreciate the differences in others, and it will become much easier to network and build strong and valuable relationships that can last for years to come.